Consultation held on new central Manchester development

Consultation held on new central Manchester development

A public consultation has been held on a new proposed apartment tower development in central Manchester.
 
Developer DeTrafford has staged the event alongside Paul Butler Associates and Simon Haugh Architects to gauge public opinion on the plan, which seeks to make use of a brownfield site near Deansgate station.
 
The project will include 399 apartments in a trio of towers, which will be 32, 26 and 18 storeys in height respectively. 
 
High as these will be, the buildings will not dominate the area as they will stand adjacent to the Owen Street project, which is already under construction and will include four huge skyscrapers with over 1,400 apartments between them. The tallest of the four Owen Street buildings will become the loftiest in the city, while the lowest of the four will be taller than the CIS Tower, which at present is the second tallest. 
 
The construction project will see the towers being constructed of red brick, the dominant building material in the city and one that will help the buildings blend in with their environment.
 
As well as the towers, the development will feature rows of townhouses and a pub with a "Coronation Street" vibe, as well as easy access to the nearby walkway over Mancunian Way that connects this part of the city centre with nearby Hulme. 
 
Manchester's city centre apartment scene has boomed over the last two decades, with a growing number of skyscrapers being planned or under construction. Indeed, if Allied London's Trinity Island project gets planning permission, the Owen Street Tower One will not hold the record for the tallest Manchester building for long, as its 658 ft height will be usurped by the 699 ft skyscraper planned as part of the centrepiece of the St John's project.
 
The increase in the area's population has prompted the Boundary Commission to plan to split the City Centre ward into two new wards, called Deansgate and Piccadilly. The population of the centre will rise past 30,000 by the early 2020s.